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Abstract Detail



Mycological Section

Bruce, Andrea [1], Osmundson, Todd [2], Maltz, Mia [3].

Plant functional group diversity and restoration methods influence filamentous fungal community composition in restored coastal sage scrub ecosystems.

Soil fungi perform ecosystem services that are beneficial to ecological restoration efforts, such as nutrient cycling, soil water retention, and soil aggregation. Even though restoration projects rarely specify fungal restoration as a desired outcome, fungi may influence the success of native plant establishment. Restoration projects aim to rebuild functional native plant communities and provide habitat for wildlife, yet restoration methods like invasive plant removal and revegetation may have consequences for soil fungi. Revegetation methods using diverse plant functional groups may likewise influence fungal diversity. Plant functional types can act as biotic filters because they can either inhibit or encourage the growth and activities of soil microbes. We hypothesized that restored sites with greater diversity of plant functional groups will harbor more diverse fungal communities than restored sites with lower diversity of plant functional groups. To compare fungal communities in coastal sage scrub revegetation plots planted with different levels of plant functional group diversity, we cultured filamentous fungi from soils using a dilution-to-extinction method. A subset of these fungal cultures was selected based on morphological differences. Fungal cultures were identified and analyzed for phylogenetic and functional diversity. Our hypothesis that fungal communities are more diverse in restored sites with greater diversity of plant functional groups than restored sites with lower diversity of plant functional groups was supported. Fungal diversity was significantly higher in vegetation treatments with three plant functional groups versus those with only one functional group. Therefore, the effect of revegetation methods on fungal diversity could have implications for restoring coastal sage scrub ecosystems.


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1 - University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Department of Biology, 3005 Cowley Hall, 1725 State St., La Crosse, WI, 54601, USA
2 - University of Wisconsin-La Crosse, Department of Biology, 3034 Cowley Hall, 1725 State St., La Crosse, WI, 54601, USA
3 - University of California, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, 321 Steinhaus Hall, Irvine, CA, 92697, USA

Keywords:
plant functional groups
diversity
Fungi
mycelium
ecological restoration
restoration methods
biotic filtering
culturable fungi.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Sections
Session: P
Location: Hall D/The Shaw Conference Centre
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2015
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: PMY055
Abstract ID:1349
Candidate for Awards:MSA Best Poster Presentation Award by a Graduate Student


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