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Abstract Detail



Biotic and abiotic stress

Han, Mei [1].

Analysis of alanine aminotransferase over-expression in Oryza sativa driven by a novel rice promoter PBpr1.

Nitrogen (N) is quantitatively the most essential nutrient for plants and a major factor limiting crop productivity. One of the critical steps restricting the efficient use of N is the ability of plants to acquire N from applied fertilizer. Recently we have shown that genetically engineered rice (Oryza sativa L.) can be developed to enhance nitrogen use efficiency (NUE) by introducing a barley AlaAT (alanine aminotransferase) cDNA driven by a rice tissue specific promoter (Shrawat et al. 2009). Despite of this finding, one of the key challenges in developing crops that utilize N as efficiently as possible remains to be how to ensure that any genes that are introduced are regulated in the appropriate manner, both in terms of tissue specificity and temporally. Here we report the use of a novel promoter PBpr1 that regulates the AlaAT gene in a way that results in an NUE phenotype, and compare its efficiency to a previously described promoter OsANT1. The development of novel NUE plants, which are driven by different promoters allows us to dissect the basis of the NUE phenotype. Moreover, at a practical level, the genetically modified NUE crop plants would not only improve the use of N fertilizers resulting in lower producer costs, but would also have significant environmental benefits.


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1 - University of Alberta/Department of Biological Sciences, 11455 Saskatchewan Drive, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2E9, Canada

Keywords:
Nitrogen use efficiency
nitrogen
nitrate uptake
remobilization
alanine aminotransferase
metabolism
transgenic plants
N15.

Presentation Type: Poster:Posters for Topics
Session: P
Location: Hall D/The Shaw Conference Centre
Date: Monday, July 27th, 2015
Time: 5:30 PM
Number: PBA005
Abstract ID:582
Candidate for Awards:None


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